Certificate

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This program of study prepares the students to be a drafting technician capable of working with engineers in the many facets of the technical drawing and solid modeling design fields. Emphasis is placed on the architectural and mechanical drafting along with drafting courses for technical comprehension of the subject. Topics include conventional drafting methods and computer-aided drafting (CAD) systems such as AutoCAD, MicroStation, and Solidworks. This program balances computer software skills with design and drafting skills. The Computer-Aided Drafting Certificate constitutes the first year of the degree program without collage seminar and Physical Education. It may also be used as preparation for the Mechanical or Civil Engineering Technology degree programs. At least one year of high school or equivalent, including algebra, is recommended.

Goal 1 The graduate will be proficient with architectural and civil drafting

  • The student will demonstrate the ability to produce several types of architectural and civil drawings.
  • The student will demonstrate understanding of the basic methods and materials used in light building construction.

Goal 2 The graduate will enter the field of architectural drafting

  • The graduate will enter a career within the architectural drafting field.

Goal 3 The graduate will complete drawings based on standard inputs from the architectural / civil field

  • The student will demonstrate standard drawing methods that include a variety of architectural concepts, facts and details.

Goal 4 The graduate will successfully communicate architectural concepts and details using drawings

  • The student will prepare architectural drawings based on generally accepted national and international standards.
  • The student will demonstrate the use of universal technical concepts (e.g. mathematics).

Goal 5 The graduate will communicate effectively within the architectural industry

  • The student will demonstrate the ability to clearly describe architectural drawings in an oral presentation.
  • The student will demonstrate the ability to gather information needed for drawings using the internet.

Goal 6 To prepare students to demonstrate information literacy

  • Students will use traditional and contemporary information technology
  • Students will identify, access, and appropriately use authoritative sources of information

Gainful Employment - follow the link below for gainful employment information.

https://www.mvcc.edu/institutional-effectiveness/gainful-employment/gainful-employment-disclosures.php

Total Credit Hours: 30 - 32

First Semester

This course introduces the techniques and concepts of GIS. The mapping software package ArcGIS is used to display, analyze, and query spatial data sets. Topics include coordinate systems/datums, symbology, classifications, digital imagery, and global positioning systems. (Fall semester)

This course covers the four fundamental operations on integers, rational numbers, and real numbers. It includes the study of weights and measures, exponents and radicals, factoring, and linear equations, with an emphasis on technical applications.

This course is a continuation of MA105 Technical Mathematics 1, with further topics from algebra as well as from geometry and trigonometry, and an emphasis on technical applications. Prerequisite: MA105 Technical Mathematics 1.

This course introduces intermediate algebra-level knowledge and skills. Topics include exponents and radicals, polynomial and rational expressions, functions and relations and their graphs, inequalities, and systems of linear equations. Linear, quadratic, rational, and radical equations are solved. Applications are included. Prerequisite: An appropriate placement test result or MA 091 Introductory Algebra, or equivalent.

This is the first of a two-course sequence for students in programs that require mathematics through polynomial calculus. Algebraic manipulations, graphing skills and problem solving are emphasized. Topics include systems of linear equations including Cramer’s Rule, quadratic equations, variation, factoring and fractions, vectors and oblique triangles, and an introduction to trigonometry and applications. Prerequisite: An appropriate placement test result or MA115 Intermediate Mathematics.

This is the second of a two-course sequence for students in programs that require mathematics through polynomial calculus. Topics include complex numbers, exponential and logarithmic functions, analytic geometry, limits, derivatives and integrals of polynomial functions, applications of the derivative, and area under a curve. Prerequisite: MA121 Fundamentals of College Mathematics 1.

This course prepares students for MA150 Precalculus. Topics include linear and quadratic equations; inequalities; rational expressions; trigonometric functions; graphs of linear, quadratic, piecewise, and trigonometric functions; and, systems of equations. Algebraic and trigonometric manipulations and problem-solving are emphasized. Prerequisite: An appropriate placement test result or MA115 Intermediate Mathematics.

This course prepares students for calculus through a study of the properties and graphs of polynomial, rational, trigonometric, inverse trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Topics include an introduction to mathematical argument and conic sections. Emphasis is placed on the function concept and the appropriate use of the language of mathematics. Prerequisite: An appropriate placement test result or MA125 College Algebra & Trigonometry.

This is the first in a sequence of three courses in analytic geometry and calculus for students intending to transfer to programs requiring a thorough background in calculus. Topics include limits and continuity, differentiation of algebraic and trigonometric functions, and indefinite and definite integration. Applications are included. Prerequisite: An appropriate placement test result or MA150 Precalculus.

This is the second in a sequence of three courses in calculus for students intending to transfer to programs requiring a thorough background in calculus. Topics include the integration of trigonometric functions, the differentiation and integration of the logarithmic, exponential, and inverse trigonometric functions, further techniques in integration, L’Hopital’s Rule, improper integrals, and infinite series. Applications are included. Prerequisite: MA151 Calculus 1.

This is the third in a sequence of three courses in calculus for students intending to transfer to programs requiring a thorough background in calculus. Topics include polar and space coordinates multiple integration, partial differentiation, and the algebra and calculus of vectors. Applications are included. Prerequisite: MA152 Calculus 2.

This course introduces the concepts and theory of ordinary differential equations. Topics include existence and uniqueness of solutions, and separable, homogenous, exact, and linear differential equations. Methods involving integrating factors, undetermined coefficients, and variation of parameters, power series, numerical approximation, and systems of differential equations using differential operators are covered. Applications are drawn from geometry, chemistry, biology, and physics. Prerequisite: MA152 Calculus 2. (Spring Semester only)

This course introduces mathematical systems. Topics include methods of proof, sets, logic, functions, relations, graphs, trees, and algebraic systems. Prerequisite: MA151 Calculus 1. (Fall Semester only)

This course begins with geometric concepts and transitions to more abstract reasoning. Topics include systems of linear equations, matrix algebra, determinants, vector spaces, bases, linear transformations, Eigen values, and inner products. Prerequisite: MA152 Calculus 2. (Spring Semester only)

EN101 English 1: Composition C-3 Cr-3

This course focuses on several kinds of writing-self-expressive, informative, and argumentative/persuasive, and others. A minimum of five essay compositions are required. The course emphasizes the composition of clear, correct, and effective prose required in a variety of professions and occupations.Prerequisites: The required developmental reading (DS051 Essential Reading & Study Skills, or SL115 ESL4: Advanced Reading), and/or writing courses (EN099 Introduction to College English or SL116 ESL4: Advanced Composition) or permission of the instructor or designee.

This course covers the effective oral and written contexts of occupational communications. It includes practice in oral presentations, business letters, resumes, memos, instructional materials and reports, and visual aids. It is designed specifically for A.O.S. degree programs. Prerequisite: An appropriate placement test result; or successful completion of DS051 Essential Reading & Study Skills, or SL115 ESL4: Advanced Reading, and successful completion of either EN099 Introduction to College English or SL116 ESL4: Advanced Composition.

This course provides the foundation and problem-solving skills necessary to develop and interpret engineering drawings using the computer-aided drafting software (AutoCAD). Topics include assembly and detail drawing composition; design for assembly/manufacturing (DFA/DFM); geometric dimensioning and tolerancing; tolerance control and standard fits; fasteners; gearing; sheet metal developments; weldments; functional drafting techniques; and the development of 2-D and 3-D CAD generated drawings and system operations.

This course is an introduction into the use of three-dimensional solid modeling CAD software. Topics include creating models using features such as protrusions, cuts, rounds, blends, revolutions, and sweeps. Model planning and design intent are stressed. Assemblies, drawings, documentation, and detailing are also covered, as well as output and interfaces with common software such as spreadsheets and word processing.

This course includes both basic technical drawing techniques and MicroStation CAD to support engineering design. Topics include line types, dimensioning, scaling, auxiliary views, sectioning, and notations. This course also introduces the use of MicroStation software. Topics include operational concepts; main palette use; projecting elements; entity construction and editing; entity manipulations; and text and dimensioning parameters.

Second Semester

This independent study capstone course involves the creation of a project using GIS. Proposals must have instructor approval. Projects incorporate collecting GPS data, building an attribute geo-database, and are completed using ArcGIS software. Final presentations are required, which explain data collection techniques, analysis, and project success. Prerequisite: CT265 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS). (Spring semester)

This course is an introduction to the standard drawing techniques and design concepts used for residential and light commercial buildings. Topics include foundations, framing, windows and doors, structural sections, floor plans, elevations, specifications, building codes, and perspectives. Prerequisite: MT140 Drafting and Design Using AutoCAD.

This is an advanced course using AutoCAD. Topics include menu customization, theory and operational concepts for three-dimensional CAD drawings and models, solid modeling, rendering and editing techniques. Prerequisites: MT140 Drafting and Design Using AutoCAD or permission of the Dean for Mathematics, Engineering, Physical Sciences, and Applied Technology..

This is an advanced level course using MicroStation. Topics include theory and operational concepts for three-dimensional CAD drawings and models, solid modeling, rendering, display, and editing techniques. Prerequisites: CT102 Engineering Drawing and MicroStation CAD, or permission of the Dean for Mathematics, Engineering, Physical Sciences, and Applied Technology.

This course covers advanced solid modeling concepts and techniques. Topics include creating complex parametric models and assemblies using all feature types; creating detail and assembly drawings with various sectioning and view techniques; measurements; surfaces; and motion and analysis models. Model and assembly pre-planning are emphasized. Prerequisites: MT155 Introduction to Solid Modeling or permission of the Associate Dean for Physical Sciences, Engineering & Applied Technologies.

Math Elective (d)Credits: 4.0

(a) Math Electives include: MA105, MA106, MA115, MA121, MA122, MA125, MA150, MA151, MA152, MA253, MA260, MA275, or MA280.

(b) English Electives include: EN101 English 1: Composition OR EN110 Oral and Written Communications.

(c) Program Electives include: Students interested in mechanical design should plan on taking MT256 Advanced Solid Modeling. Students interested in civil/architecture/construction should take MT242 Advanced MicroStation.  (d) Students interested in pursuing a degree should choose this option. Math Electives include: MA106, MA115, MA121, MA122, MA125, MA150, MA151, MA152, MA253, MA260, MA275, or MA280.