Associate in Applied Science Degree

Download PDF

This program provides the knowledge and skills necessary to perform patient assessment and to recommend, deliver, monitor and evaluate therapeutic/diagnostic respiratory care services. The A.A.S degree involves four semesters of entry and advanced level coursework, plus a five-week summer session. A.A.S graduates are eligible to take a series of national examinations that lead to the Certified Respiratory Therapist (CRT) and the Registered Respiratory Therapist (RRT) credentials. This program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Respiratory Care (CoARC). Graduates are eligible to take the Therapist Multiple Choice exam (TMC) and Clinical Simulation Exams sponsored by the National Board of Respiratory Care (NBRC). Graduation from the Respiratory Care Program does not guarantee success on national credentialing exams. Passing national credential exams is necessary to receive a license to practice as an entry-level and advanced-level respiratory therapist in New York State. If an applicant has charges pending or a felony and/or misdemeanor, a license may be delayed or denied by the applicable state licensing board.

Goal: To prepare students for employment as competent and safe advanced-level Respiratory Therapists.

  • Upon completion of the program, students will demonstrate the ability to comprehend, apply, and evaluate clinical information relevant to their roles as advanced-level Respiratory Therapists (Cognitive Domain).
  • Upon completion of the program, students will demonstrate the technical proficiency in all skills necessary to fulfill their roles as advanced-level Respiratory Therapists (Psychomotor Domain).
  • Upon completion of the program, students will demonstrate behavioral skills essential to functioning as effective advanced-level Respiratory Therapists (Affective Domain).

Faculty information is available soon.

Total Credit Hours: 65

First Semester

This course is an opportunity for students to develop the skills necessary to be successful in college. Students learn the importance of the faculty-student and advisor-advisee relationship, develop time management techniques, apply effective study skill techniques, recognize the implications of living in a diverse society, utilize college resources, and explore career and transfer requirements. Collaborative projects are included. Students matriculated in a degree program must take this course in their first term of study.

EN101 English 1: Composition C-3 Cr-3

This course focuses on several kinds of writing-self-expressive, informative, and argumentative/persuasive, and others. A minimum of five essay compositions are required. The course emphasizes the composition of clear, correct, and effective prose required in a variety of professions and occupations.Prerequisites: The required developmental reading (DS051 Essential Reading & Study Skills, or SL115 ESL4: Advanced Reading), and/or writing courses (EN099 Introduction to College English or SL116 ESL4: Advanced Composition) or permission of the instructor or designee.

This course covers the structure and function of the human organism and the regulatory processes that operate within a living system. It introduces general anatomical, physiological, and chemical organization, and includes the integumentary (skin), skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Laboratories involve vertebrate dissection, the use of prosected human cadavers and human skeletal materials, microscope work, non-invasive human experimentation, and possibly animal experimentation. High School Biology or its equivalent is recommended. Students enrolled in Life and Health Sciences Center programs are recommended to complete this course before beginning their specialized program coursework.

This course addresses topics in mathematics, physics, chemistry and microbiology related to respiratory care practice. Mathematical areas include graphing, nomograms and basic statistics. Physics and chemistry topics include the states of matter, humidity, gas pressure, gas laws, acids, bases, buffers, fluid dynamics, compliance, resistance, elastance and surface tension. A four-week module provides an introduction to microbiology at the end of the semester. Emphasis is placed on microbes that commonly involve the respiratory system. The course delivery mode is a hybrid on-line/on-site combination requiring attendance at microbiology lab sessions on the Utica Campus the last two weeks of class. Prerequisites: An appropriate Mathematics Placement test result, MA090 Essential Math Skills or MA091 Introductory Algebra, or equivalent. A minimum grade of "C" is required. (Fall semester)

This course presents the principles of pharmacology, drug actions, dosage calculations, and agents administered in cardiopulmonary care. It covers indications, side effects, hazards, and mechanisms of action, general categories, and classification of drugs. Respiratory, cardiovascular, neuromuscular, sedative-narcotic, and anti-infective agents are reviewed. Prerequisites: An appropriate Mathematics Placement test result, or MA090 Essential Math Skills or MA091 Introductory Algebra, or equivalent. A minimum grade of "C" is required. (Fall semester)

This is the first course in the curriculum sequence to study the theory and practice of respiratory care. Topics include cardiopulmonary anatomy and physiology (including lung and cardiac function, mechanics of breathing, oxygen and carbon dioxide exchange, and control of ventilation), gas administration therapies, humidity and aerosol therapies and bronchial hygiene techniques. Prerequisites: An appropriate Mathematics Placement test result, or MA090 Essential Math Skills or MA091 Introductory Algebra, or equivalent. A minimum grade of "C" is required. (Fall semester)

Second Semester

This course, which is a continuation of BI216 Human Anatomy & Physiology 1, involves the study of structure, function, and regulation in the human organism. Topics include blood, peripheral nerves, the cardiovascular system, lymphatics, the respiratory system, the excretory system, the endocrine system, the reproductive systems, the digestive system, and metabolism. Laboratories involve vertebrate dissection, the use of prosected human cadavers and human skeletal materials, microscope work, non-invasive human experimentation, and possibly animal experimentation. Prerequisite: BI216 Human Anatomy & Physiology 1, permission from the Dean of Life and Health Sciences.. Students enrolled in Life and Health Sciences Center programs are recommended to complete this course before beginning their specialized program coursework. Students with transfer credit for BI216 Anatomy and Physiology 1 must complete a three-hour orientation to the use of prosected human cadavers before participating in the BI217 Human Anatomy and Physiology 2 laboratory. Transfer students must meet with the Associate Dean of Mathematics and Natural Sciences.

This is the second course in the curriculum sequence to study the theory and practice of respiratory care. Topics include lung expansion therapies, airway management, acid-base balance, and the interpretation of arterial blood gas results. Detailed information required to initiate, maintain, monitor, and wean patients from mechanical ventilation is provided. Prerequisites: A full year of high school general chemistry with laboratory (with a minimum grade of 70) within ten years or equivalent course with a minimum grade of C, RC101 Basic Science for Respiratory Care, RC103 Cardiopulmonary Pharmacology, and RC111 Principles of Respiratory Care 1. Corequisites: BI216 Human Anatomy & Physiology 1, RC115 Cardiopulmonary Diseases, and RC131 Clinical Practicum 1(a) or Program Coordinator consent. (a) Minimum grade of "C" required. (Spring semester)

The initial portion of this course stresses the integral components of data collection, assessment, and evaluation necessary for the development of an effective care plan for patients with cardiopulmonary disorders. The remainder emphasizes the etiology, manifestations, and treatment of a variety of cardiopulmonary diseases. Case study presentations use critical thinking skills. Prerequisites: A full year of high school general chemistry with laboratory (with a minimum grade of 70) within seven years or equivalent courses with a minimum grade of C, RC101 Basic Science for Respiratory Care, RC103 Cardiopulmonary Pharmacology, and RC111 Principles of Respiratory Care 1. Corequisites: BI216 Human Anatomy & Physiology 1, RC112 Principles of Respiratory Care 2, and RC131 Clinical Practicum 1, or Program Coordinator consent. Minimum grade of C required. (Spring semester)

This initial 135-hour hospital experience provides the supervised practice of routine respiratory therapies in a community clinical setting. Theories and skills learned in the classroom and laboratory are applied in actual patient care situations. The safe administration of therapies, maintenance of records, and infection control procedures are stressed. Prerequisites: Documented health physical examination within three months, including specific test results, liability insurance coverage, and current CPR for Healthcare Providers Certification are required for all students before the start of this course. A full year of high school general chemistry with laboratory (with a minimum grade of 70) within ten years or equivalent course with a minimum grade of C, RC101 Basic Science for Respiratory Care, RC103 Cardiopulmonary Pharmacology, RC111 Principles of Respiratory Care 1(a). Corequisites: BI216 Human Anatomy & Physiology 1 (a) and RC115 Cardiopulmonary Diseases, or Program Coordinator consent.(a) Minimum grade of "C" required. (Spring semester)

Third Semester

This course encourages a deeper understanding of human nature and the human condition through the study of ideas and values expressed in imaginative literature. Emphasis is placed on the use and development of critical thinking and language skills. Library-oriented research is required. Prerequisite: EN101 English 1: Composition or EN106 English 1: Composition and Reading.

This course is a survey of mathematics for students in those programs that do not require a mathematics sequence. It provides an appreciation of mathematical ideas in historical and modern settings. Topics include problem solving, logic, geometry, statistics, and consumer mathematics. Prerequisite: An appropriate placement test result or MA090 Essential Math Skills or MA091 Introductory Algebra, or MA096 Mathematical Literacy.

This course introduces probability and statistics. Topics include graphs, tables, frequency distributions, measures of central tendency and dispersion, normal distribution, correlation and regression, probability, and inferential statistics. This course is available in two formats: lecture only, or lecture plus laboratory using technology. Prerequisite: An appropriate placement test result or MA090 Essential Math Skills or MA 091 Introductory Algebra, or MA096 Mathematical Literacy.

This is the third course in the curriculum sequence to study the theory and practice of respiratory care. Topics include cardiopulmonary diagnostics and monitoring, special procedures (i.e., bronchoscopy and thoracentesis), critical care pharmacology, home care, and advanced management for the patient requiring mechanical ventilation. Prerequisites: BI217 Human Anatomy & Physiology 2, RC112 Principles of Respiratory Care 2, RC115 Cardiopulmonary Diseases, RC131 Clinical Practicum 1. Corequisites: RC232 Clinical Practicum 2, or Program Coordinator consent. Minimum grade of C required.

This course provides opportunities to practice routine procedures and adult critical care during 270 hours of experience in a variety of clinical sites. Specialty rotations include pulmonary function testing, cardiac catheterization, cardiac diagnostics, respiratory homecare, polysomnography, radiology, and cardiothoracic surgery. Safe practice, critical thinking and problem solving are key components. Prerequisites: BI217 Human Anatomy and Physiology 2, RC112 Principles of Respiratory Care 2, RC115 Cardiopulmonary Diseases, and RC131 Clinical Practicum 1. Corequisites: RC213 Principles of Respiratory Care 3, or Program Coordinator consent. Minimum grade of C required. (Fall semester)

Fourth Semester

This course examines the physiological consequences of various disease states. Diseases are treated as threats to homeostasis. The effects of pathology on normal bodily processes are discussed at various organizational levels, including biochemical, cellular, histological, and organ systems. This course is designed for allied health students. Prerequisites: BI216 Human Anatomy & Physiology 1 or permission from the Dean of Life and Health Sciences. Corequisite: BI217 Human Anatomy & Physiology 2.

This course introduces the many and varied facets of psychology. Emphasis is on interactions of individuals in their cultural, social, and economic environments as determined by their cognitive, behavioral, and emotional experiences and training.

This course gives an understanding of and a feeling for the society in which we live. The concepts and theories discussed relate to humanity, its culture and society, and to those forces that contribute to the smooth operation of this society as well as those forces that contribute to conflict and social problems. Topics include culture, socialization, stratification, population, and patterns of social organization.

This course covers the concepts of fluid and electrolyte balance, and the implications of the cardiopulmonary/ renal systems on acid-base homeostasis in the body. Focus is placed on the application of acid-base physiology in the clinical arena and its impact on patient management. Emphasis is placed on interpretation of fluid and electrolyte imbalance, and their interrelationships. Prerequisite: BI217 Human Anatomy & Physiology 2 (a) or instructor consent. (a) Minimum grade of "C" required. (Spring semester)

This course involves 270 hours of experience in at least four clinical affiliates. Emphasis is placed on adult critical care experiences. Specialty rotations include a physician preceptorship, routine pediatric care, and Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) completion. Prerequisites: RC213 Principles of Respiratory Care 3, and RC232 Clinical Practicum 2 or Program Coordinator consent. Minimum grade of C required. (Spring semester)

Summer Session

This is the fourth course in the curriculum sequence to study the theory and practice of respiratory care. This concentrated offering presents topics related to neonatal and pediatric respiratory care. Content areas include neonatal and pediatric diseases, pharmacology, airway management, mechanical ventilation, high-frequency oscillation, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Prerequisites: RC233 Clinical Practicum 3, RC214 Acid Base Physiology, and BI209 Basic Pathophysiology. Corequisite: RC234 Clinical Practicum 4 or Program Coordinator consent. Minimum grade of C required. (Summer session)

This course provides opportunities to perform all aspects of respiratory care with emphasis on neonatal, pediatric and adult critical care during 225 hours of experience in a variety of clinical sites. Requirements are completed for American Heart Association (AHA) Neonatal Resuscitation Protocol (NRP) and Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS). Specialty rotations include extended ventilator care, critical care monitoring and patient assessment. Adult rotations provide a capstone experience to facilitate the transition from student to entry-level practitioner. Safe practice, critical thinking, problem solving and time management are key components. Prerequisite: RC232 Clinical Practicum 3. Corequisite: RC215 Principles of Respiratory Care 4. Minimum grade of C required. (Summer session)

(a) Mathematics options include: MA108 Concepts in Mathematics OR MA110 Elementary Statistics

(b) Social Science options include: PY101 Introduction to Psychology OR SO101 Introduction to Sociology

Students must have a minimum GPA of 2.5 to be considered for admission to the Respiratory Care program. 

A grade of “C” or higher is required in all RC prefix courses. To enhance success in the Respiratory Care curriculum, it is recommended that Human Anatomy & Physiology 1 and 2 be taken at MVCC.

  • Students who have a grade of “D” in BI216 Human Anatomy & Physiology 1 and/or BI217 Human Anatomy & Physiology 2 may advance in the Respiratory Care Program course sequence but must repeat the Human Anatomy & Physiology courses and achieve grades of at least a “C” to be eligible to graduate from the Respiratory Care program.
  • Students may repeat each Respiratory Care course once only.
  • Respiratory Care students enrolled in a respiratory care (RC) course are permitted one withdrawal. A second withdrawal from any RC course will result in dismissal from the program and ineligibility to return to the Respiratory Care program.
  • Students must have at least a 2.0 GPA to be eligible to graduate from this program.
  • All students enrolled in the Respiratory Care program are required to take the three Self-Assessment Exams (SAEs) by Applied Measurement Professionals (cost $30-$70 each).
  • All students enrolled in Clinical Practicum 3 (RC233) are required to take the Kettering National Review Seminar (approximate cost $300).
  • Clinical assignments include rotations that require travel within and outside the Utica/Rome area. Students must provide their own transportation to and from designated clinical sites (Utica/Rome area, Syracuse, and Cooperstown). A dress code exists and identified items (nametag, picture ID, stethoscope, watch, etc.) are required for clinical sessions.
  • Professional liability insurance is required when enrolled in clinical courses. This insurance is purchased through the College when registering for clinical courses.
  • Accident Insurance is required for all full-time and part-time enrolled in RC courses.
  • Grades of “C” or higher are required for the following RC courses to be eligible to advance to the next sequential course: RC111, RC112, RC213, RC215; RC131, RC232, RC233, and RC234 (Principles of Respiratory Care and Clinical Practicum courses). Human Anatomy & Physiology 1 and 2 (BI216 and BI217) require a minimum grade of “C” for successful completion.
  • Students who fail BI216 Human Anatomy & Physiology 1 and/ or BI217 Human Anatomy & Physiology 2 may not advance in the Principles of Respiratory Care or Clinical Practicum courses until a passing grade is achieved.

Prerequisites for Respiratory Care courses:

  • High school chemistry (with lab) or its equivalent with a minimum grade of 70, within seven years. • High school biology (with lab) is recommended.
  • An appropriate Mathematics placement test result. The MVCC mathematics placement test is based on content presented in two high school mathematics courses or the equivalent.
  • For students completing mathematics and chemistry prerequisites by taking equivalent courses, a minimum grade of “C” is required.
  • Matriculation into the Respiratory Care Program.
  • Personal meeting with program advisor prior to starting classes.
  • Proof of current American Heart Association CPR course for Healthcare Providers certification, on file in the Health Center prior to starting clinical courses. CPR certification must be kept current throughout the program.
  • A Respiratory Care Student Physical Health Form and proof of immunizations must be submitted prior to participation in clinical 104 courses, and updated annually at the student’s expense. A PPD skin test is required yearly to screen for tuberculosis (TB) exposure. Exception: If a student has a positive PPD and/or has received a BCG vaccine, a chest X-ray is required every two years. A positive PPD with active TB symptomatology requires an immediate chest X-ray and medical evaluation. Most clinical affiliates require students to receive the Hepatitis B vaccination series or sign a declination statement as a condition for practicing in the facility.
  • Shadowing a respiratory therapist at a health care facility is required prior to admission to the Respiratory Care Program.

Transfer or Returning Students

Prior to beginning or resuming Respiratory Care course work, transfer and returning students must:

  • Meet with a Respiratory Care advisor. Call for an appointment at 315-792-5664. • Submit proof of CPR certification to the Health Center.
  • Submit a completed Respiratory Care Student Health Form to the Respiratory Care Clinical Coordinator.
  • Pass applicable Proficiency Written and/or Skill Exam. A fee is charged for proficiency exams.
  • Pass the Respiratory Care Medication Written Exam with 80% accuracy, which includes medication calculations.