Associate in Applied Science Degree

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This program is registered with the New York State Department of Education, Office of Professions, and accredited by the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN). It is for people interested in performing the duties associated with being a Registered Nurse. Graduates are prepared as beginning practitioners in nursing and are eligible for the New York State licensing examination. This program is approved by the New York State Board of Nursing and Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing.

Upon successful completion of the program the graduate will: Patient Centered Care

  • Evaluate nursing care provided to patients, families, groups, and communities across the lifespan from diverse backgrounds in a variety of settings to ensure that it is compassionate, age and culturally appropriate, and based on a patient’s preference, values, and needs.

Teamwork and Collaboration

  • Collaborate with members of the inter-professional healthcare team to manage and coordinate the provision of safe, quality care for patients, families, and groups.

Evidence Based Practice

  • Demonstrate use of best current evidence and clinical expertise when making clinical decisions in the provisions of patient centered care.

Informatics

  • Use evidence based information and patient care technology to communicate relevant patient information, manage care, and mitigate error in the provision of safe, quality, patient centered care.

Quality Improvement

  • Use evidence based quality improvement processes to effect change in the delivery of patient centered care.

Safety

  • Demonstrate effective use of strategies to mitigate errors and reduce the risk of harm to patients, self, and others in a variety of settings.

Leadership

  • Use leadership, management, and priority setting skills in the provision and management of safe, quality, patient centered care.

Professionalism

  • Assimilate integrity and accountability into practice that upholds established regulatory, legal, and ethical principles while providing patient centered care.

Total Credit Hours: 62 - 63

First Semester

This course is an opportunity for students to develop the skills necessary to be successful in college. Students learn the importance of the faculty-student and advisor-advisee relationship, develop time management techniques, apply effective study skill techniques, recognize the implications of living in a diverse society, utilize college resources, and explore career and transfer requirements. Collaborative projects are included. Students matriculated in a degree program must take this course in their first term of study.

EN101 English 1: Composition C-3 Cr-3

This course focuses on several kinds of writing-self-expressive, informative, and argumentative/persuasive, and others. A minimum of five essay compositions are required. The course emphasizes the composition of clear, correct, and effective prose required in a variety of professions and occupations.Prerequisites: The required developmental reading (DS051 Essential Reading & Study Skills, or SL115 ESL4: Advanced Reading), and/or writing courses (EN099 Introduction to College English or SL116 ESL4: Advanced Composition) or permission of the instructor or designee.

This course introduces the many and varied facets of psychology. Emphasis is on interactions of individuals in their cultural, social, and economic environments as determined by their cognitive, behavioral, and emotional experiences and training.

This course covers the structure and function of the human organism and the regulatory processes that operate within a living system. It introduces general anatomical, physiological, and chemical organization, and includes the integumentary (skin), skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Laboratories involve vertebrate dissection, the use of prosected human cadavers and human skeletal materials, microscope work, non-invasive human experimentation, and possibly animal experimentation. High School Biology or its equivalent is recommended. Students enrolled in Life and Health Sciences Center programs are recommended to complete this course before beginning their specialized program coursework.

This course explores the art and science of nursing and provides the foundation for all subsequent nursing courses. The physical, physiological, psychological, sociocultural, and spiritual needs of the client are emphasized in the promotion of health and wellness. The roles and responsibilities of nursing practice in contemporary society are explored. Basic concepts of Maslow’s Hierarchy of

Needs Theory, the nursing process, communication, critical thinking, leadership and management principles, ethical and legal aspects, and scientific principles of nursing and nursing skills are introduced. Clinical practicums are provided in a variety of health care facilities. Prerequisites: An appropriate Mathematics Placement test result, high school chemistry with laboratory or its equivalent, and BI216 Human Anatomy & Physiology 1. Mandatory Corequisite: NU111

Nursing Pharmacotherapeutics 1. (Fall semester.)

This course introduces the concepts pertaining to the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of medications and dosage calculation for medication administration. Mandatory Corequisite: NU101 Nursing 1. (Fall Semester only)

Second Semester

This course encourages a deeper understanding of human nature and the human condition through the study of ideas and values expressed in imaginative literature. Emphasis is placed on the use and development of critical thinking and language skills. Library-oriented research is required. Prerequisite: EN101 English 1: Composition or EN106 English 1: Composition and Reading.

This course, which is a continuation of BI216 Human Anatomy & Physiology 1, involves the study of structure, function, and regulation in the human organism. Topics include blood, peripheral nerves, the cardiovascular system, lymphatics, the respiratory system, the excretory system, the endocrine system, the reproductive systems, the digestive system, and metabolism. Laboratories involve vertebrate dissection, the use of prosected human cadavers and human skeletal materials, microscope work, non-invasive human experimentation, and possibly animal experimentation. Prerequisite: BI216 Human Anatomy & Physiology 1, permission from the Dean of Life and Health Sciences.. Students enrolled in Life and Health Sciences Center programs are recommended to complete this course before beginning their specialized program coursework. Students with transfer credit for BI216 Anatomy and Physiology 1 must complete a three-hour orientation to the use of prosected human cadavers before participating in the BI217 Human Anatomy and Physiology 2 laboratory. Transfer students must meet with the Associate Dean of Mathematics and Natural Sciences.

This course explores the changes that take place in human development from conception to death. Cognitive, emotional, social, and physical developments are covered at each chronological stage. Emphasis is placed on biological and environmental influences across the life-span. Prerequisite: PY101 Introduction to General Psychology. Students who have successfully completed PY202 Childhood and Adolescence and/or PY205 Adulthood and Aging may not take PY207 Life-Span Developmental Psychology.

This course focuses on the physical, physiological, cultural, spiritual, and psychological needs experienced by the expanding family during pregnancy, labor, delivery, and postpartum periods. The nursing process, Maslows Hierarchy of Needs theory, and critical thinking are integrated to meet the needs of the family in the perinatal cycle. Clinical experiences are provided in general hospital units and community agencies. Prerequisites:NU101 Nursing 1 with a minimum grade of 75 or advanced standing; NU111 Nursing Pharmacotherapeutics 1 with a minimum grade of 75 or advanced standing; Corequisite: BI217 Human Anatomy & Physiology 2. Mandatory Corequisite: NU103 Nursing 2B (Mental Health and Psychiatric Nursing Throughout the Life Cycle). (Spring semester)

This course addresses the foundations of mental health and psychiatric nursing. It examines threats to the basic psychological needs of security, love and belonging, self-esteem, and self-actualization throughout the life cycle. The nursing process, Maslows Hierarchy of Needs theory, and critical thinking are integrated to meet the needs of the client experiencing a disruption in mental health. Interpersonal relationships between the nurse and client are emphasized as a therapeutic modality. Clinical practicums are provided in mental health and psychiatric settings. Prerequisites: NU101 Nursing 1 with a minimum grade of 75 or advanced standing; NU111 Nursing Pharmacotherapeutics 1 with a minimum grade of 75 or advanced standing. Corequisite: BI217 Human Anatomy & Physiology 2. Mandatory Corequisite:NU102 Nursing 2A (Family-Centered Nursing during the Pregnancy Cycle). (Spring semester)

Third Semester

This course focuses on the pathophysiologic and psychosocial responses in clients experiencing disruptions in oxygenation, nutrition, and metabolic function. It analyzes the role of the professional registered nurse in assisting clients to adapt to these stressors. The nursing process, Maslows Hierarchy of Needs theory and critical thinking are integrated to meet the needs of the client experiencing a disruption in a medical/surgical setting. Concepts of nursing leadership and management are applied in providing care for a group of clients. A clinical practicum in a medical/surgical setting provides opportunities to assess and meet the needs of selected clients throughout the life cycle. Prerequisites: NU101 Nursing 1, NU111 Nursing Pharmacotherapeutics 1, NU102 Nursing 2A, NU103 Nursing 2B, all with a minimum grade of 75 or advanced standing; and BI217 Human Anatomy & Physiology 2 with a minimum grade of 70; Corequisite: BI201 Microbiology. (Fall semester)

This course introduces the morphology, physiology, and genetics of microorganisms and their impact on health and environment. Organisms studied include bacteria, fungi, virus, and protozoa. Laboratories emphasize safe handling and culturing of live bacteria, as well as identification procedures. Prerequisites: BI141 General Biology 1, or BI217 Human Anatomy & Physiology 2.

Fourth Semester

This course focuses on the pathophysiologic and psychosocial responses in clients experiencing disruptions in elimination, cognition and sensation, musculoskeletal function, protection, and cellular aberration. The nursing process, Maslows Hierarchy of Needs theory and critical thinking are integrated to meet the needs of the client experiencing a disruption in a medical/surgical setting. It explores the political, economic, social, and cultural influences on nursing practice and healthcare. It assists the second-year student to become a contributing member within the discipline of nursing. A clinical practicum in a medical/surgical setting provides opportunities to assess and meet the needs of selected clients throughout the life cycle. A 64-hour capstone experience assists in the transition to entry level graduate nurse. Prerequisite: NU201 Nursing 3 with a minimum grade of 75. (Spring semester)

This course is a survey of mathematics for students in those programs that do not require a mathematics sequence. It provides an appreciation of mathematical ideas in historical and modern settings. Topics include problem solving, logic, geometry, statistics, and consumer mathematics. Prerequisite: An appropriate placement test result or MA090 Essential Math Skills or MA091 Introductory Algebra, or MA096 Mathematical Literacy.

This course introduces probability and statistics. Topics include graphs, tables, frequency distributions, measures of central tendency and dispersion, normal distribution, correlation and regression, probability, and inferential statistics. This course is available in two formats: lecture only, or lecture plus laboratory using technology. Prerequisite: An appropriate placement test result or MA090 Essential Math Skills or MA 091 Introductory Algebra, or MA096 Mathematical Literacy.

This course introduces intermediate algebra-level knowledge and skills. Topics include exponents and radicals, polynomial and rational expressions, functions and relations and their graphs, inequalities, and systems of linear equations. Linear, quadratic, rational, and radical equations are solved. Applications are included. Prerequisite: An appropriate placement test result or MA 091 Introductory Algebra, or equivalent.

(a) Math options include: MA108 Concepts in Mathematics, MA110 Elementary Statistics, OR MA115 Intermediate Mathematics.

  • All courses in the Associate Degree Nursing program have content and clinical laboratory experiences. 
  • All students are required to meet the prerequisites prior to taking the first nursing courses. Students must have a program GPA of 2.8 or greater to be considered for admission intoNursing 1.
  • Students must provide their own transportation to and from the health care agency for clinical experience.
  • Professional liability insurance, available through the College, is required and payable at registration.
  • Proof of current American Heart Association CPR certification for Healthcare Providers must be on file in the Health Center prior to beginning clinical experiences. This certification must be kept current throughout the program.
  • Grades of 75 or higher are required in each nursing course for advancement to the next nursing course.
  • Grades of 70 or higher are required in Anatomy and Physiology, and Microbiology. To enhance success in the Nursing curriculum, it is  recommended that Human Anatomy & Physiology 1 and 2 be taken at MVCC.
  • A grade of “C” or higher is required in all Nursing, liberal arts, and science courses.
  • Students must successfully complete BI216 Human Anatomy & Physiology 1 (with a 70 or greater) prior to Nursing 2. Students must successfully complete BI217 Human Anatomy & Physiology2 (with a 70 or greater) to be eligible to enter Nursing 3.
  • Effective Spring 2017: Dismissed students will be ineligible to return to the Nursing program.
  • If the student achieves less than a C grade in Anatomy and Physiology, or Microbiology, he/she will be dismissed from the program.
  • Credit by exam is not an option for students who have been unsuccessful in any Nursing, Anatomy and Physiology, or Microbiology course.
  • Students must have a 2.0 GPA to be eligible to graduate from this program.
  • All Nursing students enrolled in Nursing 4 (NU202) are required to take the Diagnostic Readiness Test and the designated NCLEX-RN State Board Review Class in order to be eligible to graduate from the program.
  • Graduation from the Nursing program does not guarantee R.N. licensure by the Board of Nurse Registration. If applicant has charges pending or has been convicted of felony and/or misdemeanor, a license may be delayed or denied by the New York State Board of Nursing.

Transfer or Returning Students:

Students who have been out of the Nursing sequence for one or more semesters or students returning to the Nursing sequence must:

  • Make an appointment with the Associate Dean. Call 315-792-5375.
  • Meet all prerequisites as listed.
  • Pass the applicable Proficiency Skill Examination with 100% accuracy.
  • Pass the Dosage Calculation Examination with 80% accuracy. Prerequisites to Enrolling in Nursing-Specific Courses:
    1. Appropriate mathematics placement test result.
    2. High school chemistry with lab or its equivalent. (Regents scores of 70 or high school scores of 70 within 10 years of admission to first Nursing course.)
    3. High school biology or its equivalent is recommended.
    4. Proof of current American Heart Association CPR for Healthcare Providers or PE171 CPR certification must be on file in the Health Center, ACC104.
    5. Nursing Health Physical Form completed and on file by July 1, for Fall admission, and Dec. 1 for Spring admission to NU102/103. (Updated yearly at student’s expense.) Prerequisite courses can be completed at MVCC.
    6. Prerequisites taken at MVCC or other institutions must have a final grade of C or better within five years of starting a Nursing course.
    7. A letter of intent is mailed or emailed to students meeting the prerequisite requirements in January each year. The student must return the letter of intent to request a place for NU101 Nursing 1 for the subsequent Fall semester. If a response is not received, the seat will be given to the next qualified candidate.
    Returning the letter does not guarantee a place in NU101 Nursing 1.