Associate in Science Degree

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Graduates in this area of study have successfully transferred to undergraduate engineering, computer science, mathematics education, statistics, and mathematics programs at many colleges. MVCC also has articulation agreements with a range of institutions. Please contact the S.T.E.M. Department for more information regarding articulation agreements. Two years of high school mathematics, or the equivalent, and one year of laboratory science are required. Two years of a foreign language recommended.

Goal 1 To prepare mathematics majors for transfer to a 4-year institution in mathematics or related field (related field to include computer science, engineering science, secondary education, actuarial, or physics)

  • Graduates of the program transfer to a 4-year institution in mathematics or related field
  • Graduates have completed at least 8 of the 10 SUNY silos of General Education.

Goal 2 To prepare mathematics majors to communicate effectively

  • Students of the program will demonstrate the ability to interpret and communicate mathematics orally.
  • Students of the program will demonstrate the ability to interpret and communicate mathematics in writing.
  • Students will communicate results of scientific inquiry.
  • Students will communicate information and ideas clearly in written form using correct structure, grammar, spelling and organization.

Goal 3 To prepare mathematics majors to demonstrate logical thinking

  • Students will demonstrate proficiency in writing proofs using rigorous mathematical reasoning.
  • Students will demonstrate basic manipulative skills in analytic geometry, trigonometry, and calculus.
  • Students will demonstrate an ability to investigate and apply mathematical problems and solutions from a variety of contexts (science, technology, business and industry).

Goal 4 To prepare mathematics majors to interact effectively with others in a group to reach a common goal and to complete the Diversity and Global View requirement

  • Students will be able to work effectively within a group by demonstrating openness toward diverse points of view, drawing upon knowledge and experience of others to function as a group member, demonstrating skill in negotiating differences and working toward solutions.
  • Graduates will complete the Diversity and Global View requirement.

Goal 5 To prepare mathematics majors to solve problems

  • Students will be able to state a problem correctly, reason analytically to a solution and interpret the results.
  • Students will demonstrate the ability to solve equations using rigorous mathematical reasoning.
  • Students will be able to solve application problems from numerical, graphical and/or analytical perspectives.
  • Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of how mathematics can be used to analyze real world situations.

Goal 6 To prepare mathematics majors to utilize appropriate technology

  • Students will be able to use technology appropriately to solve problems.
  • Students will be able to collect and/or analyze data using the appropriate technology.

Goal 7 To prepare students to demonstrate information literacy

  • Students will use traditional and contemporary information technology.
  • Students will identify, access, and appropriately use authoritative sources of information.

Total Credit Hours: 64

First Semester

This course is an opportunity for students to develop the skills necessary to be successful in college. Students learn the importance of the faculty-student and advisor-advisee relationship, develop time management techniques, apply effective study skill techniques, recognize the implications of living in a diverse society, utilize college resources, and explore career and transfer requirements. Collaborative projects are included. Students matriculated in a degree program must take this course in their first term of study.

EN101 English 1: Composition C-3 Cr-3

This course focuses on several kinds of writing-self-expressive, informative, and argumentative/persuasive, and others. A minimum of five essay compositions are required. The course emphasizes the composition of clear, correct, and effective prose required in a variety of professions and occupations.Prerequisites: The required developmental reading (DS051 Essential Reading & Study Skills, or SL115 ESL4: Advanced Reading), and/or writing courses (EN099 Introduction to College English or SL116 ESL4: Advanced Composition) or permission of the instructor or designee.

This course prepares students for calculus through a study of the properties and graphs of polynomial, rational, trigonometric, inverse trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Topics include an introduction to mathematical argument and conic sections. Emphasis is placed on the function concept and the appropriate use of the language of mathematics. Prerequisite: An appropriate placement test result or MA125 College Algebra & Trigonometry.

This course introduces the nature and study of history, and covers the emergence and development of Eurasian civilization to about 1500 A.D. in the Near East, India, China, Europe, the Western Hemisphere, and Africa. Attention is given to religion in these civilizations and on the rise of the West to a position of world power during the Middle Ages.

Students should take either CI110 and CI130 or two semesters of a foreign language

Take either AN101, BM101, PS101, PY101, or SO101

Take any Physical Education Course

Second Semester

This course encourages a deeper understanding of human nature and the human condition through the study of ideas and values expressed in imaginative literature. Emphasis is placed on the use and development of critical thinking and language skills. Library-oriented research is required. Prerequisite: EN101 English 1: Composition or EN106 English 1: Composition and Reading.

Take either AN101, BM101, PS101, PY101, or SO101

This is the first in a sequence of three courses in analytic geometry and calculus for students intending to transfer to programs requiring a thorough background in calculus. Topics include limits and continuity, differentiation of algebraic and trigonometric functions, and indefinite and definite integration. Applications are included. Prerequisite: An appropriate placement test result or MA150 Precalculus.

This course is concerned with civilizations and their influences on each other in the modern world. It traces the rise of the West to a position of world dominance and its impact on non-Western societies. Emphasis is placed on the major forces that have shaped the contemporary world - industrialization, urbanization, nationalism, militarism, imperialism, democracy, and communism.

Students should take either CI110 and CI130 or two semesters of a foreign language

Take any Physical Education Course

Third Semester

This course introduces mathematical systems. Topics include methods of proof, sets, logic, functions, relations, graphs, trees, and algebraic systems. Prerequisite: MA151 Calculus 1. (Fall Semester only)

This is the second in a sequence of three courses in calculus for students intending to transfer to programs requiring a thorough background in calculus. Topics include the integration of trigonometric functions, the differentiation and integration of the logarithmic, exponential, and inverse trigonometric functions, further techniques in integration, L’Hopital’s Rule, improper integrals, and infinite series. Applications are included. Prerequisite: MA151 Calculus 1.

Students should take either BI141 & BI142, CH141 & CH142, GL101 & GL102, PH142 & PH142, PH151 & PH152, or PH261 & PH262 Physics sequence recommended

Six hours of restricted electives, chosen upon advisement, provide the opportunity for the student to pursue courses that are related to career objectives or transfer requirements.

Take any Physical Education Course

Fourth Semester

Students should take either BI141 & BI142, CH141 & CH142, GL101 & GL102, PH142 & PH142, PH151 & PH152, or PH261 & PH262 Physics sequence recommended

This is the third in a sequence of three courses in calculus for students intending to transfer to programs requiring a thorough background in calculus. Topics include polar and space coordinates multiple integration, partial differentiation, and the algebra and calculus of vectors. Applications are included. Prerequisite: MA152 Calculus 2.

Six hours of restricted electives, chosen upon advisement, provide the opportunity for the student to pursue courses that are related to career objectives or transfer requirements.

This course begins with geometric concepts and transitions to more abstract reasoning. Topics include systems of linear equations, matrix algebra, determinants, vector spaces, bases, linear transformations, Eigen values, and inner products. Prerequisite: MA152 Calculus 2. (Spring Semester only)

Take any Physical Education Course

(a) Social Science Electives include: AN101, BM101, PS101, PY101, or SO101.

(b) Restrictive Sequence Electives include: Students should take either CI110 and CI130 or two semesters of a foreign language.

(c) Natural Science Electives include: BI141 & BI142, CH141 & CH142, GL101 & GL102, PH142 & PH142, PH151 & PH152, or PH261 & PH262 Physics sequence recommended.

(d) Six hours of restricted electives, chosen upon advisement, provide the opportunity for the student to pursue courses that are related to career objectives or transfer requirements.