Associate in Science Degree

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This curriculum is designed to serve the interests of students with goals and strengths in the mathematics and science fields while broadening their knowledge in allied disciplines and clarifying career objectives. In collaboration with a faculty advisor, students can plan a program of study that will prepare them to transfer to a baccalaureate program. Students must choose one area of interests, including: Biology, Chemistry, Environmental Science, Environmental Studies, General Science, Geology, Mathematics, Physics, Physical Education, or Sports Medicine. Upon successfully completing the program requirements, students will earn a Liberal Arts & Sciences Mathematics and Science degree. Number of courses and sequencing will vary depending on students transferring interests.

Goal 1 Provide the students the opportunity to communicate results of scientific inquiry

  • Students will produce and submit clear written reports of scientific inquiry.

Goal 2 Provide students with opportunities to collect, organize, and evaluate scientific information

  • Students will identify the underlying scientific concepts of laboratory exercises.
  • Students will acquire, evaluate, and synthesize information from a variety of different sources.
  • Students will demonstrate the skills necessary to collect data.
  • Students will analyze and interpret data in a written scientific lab report.

Goal 3 To provide students the opportunity to work in groups and diverse experiences and interactions.

  • Students will work collaboratively in the laboratory demonstrating skill toward the completion of a common project.
  • Students will attend DGV events and complete online DGV modules.

Goal 4 To prepare students to demonstrate analytical and computational skills

  • Students will be able to present and interpret data using appropriate scale and format.
  • Students will be able to quantify evolutionary processes.

Goal 5 To provide students with a sound academic curriculum for transfer to a related baccalaureate institution

  • Students will use traditional and contemporary information technology.
  • Students will identify, access, and appropriately use authoritative sources of information.

Goal 6 To prepare mathematics majors to utilize appropriate technology

  • Graduates will complete all required course work in the program including math through algebra and trigonometry, Biology 1 and 2, and Chemistry 1 and 2, and two lab science electives
  • Graduates will complete seven of the ten SUNY silos of General Education.

Total Credit Hours: 61 – 65 (Refer to Tranfer Advising Guide)

First Semester

This course is an opportunity for students to develop the skills necessary to be successful in college. Students learn the importance of the faculty-student and advisor-advisee relationship, develop time management techniques, apply effective study skill techniques, recognize the implications of living in a diverse society, utilize college resources, and explore career and transfer requirements. Collaborative projects are included. Students matriculated in a degree program must take this course in their first term of study.

EN101 English 1: Composition C-3 Cr-3

This course focuses on several kinds of writing-self-expressive, informative, and argumentative/persuasive, and others. A minimum of five essay compositions are required. The course emphasizes the composition of clear, correct, and effective prose required in a variety of professions and occupations.Prerequisites: The required developmental reading (DS051 Essential Reading & Study Skills, or SL115 ESL4: Advanced Reading), and/or writing courses (EN099 Introduction to College English or SL116 ESL4: Advanced Composition) or permission of the instructor or designee.

Students must choose one of the following: BM101 Survey of Economics, PY101 Introduction to General Psychology, SO101 Introduction to Sociology, AN101 Biological Anthropology, PS101 American National Government, GE101 Essentials of World Geography.

At least 6 credits in a General Education mathematics, at a level approved by the Department administering the program (refer to specific area of study)

Refer to specific transfer area of choice: Biology, Chemistry, Environmental Studies, Environmental Science, General Science, Geology, Mathematics Physical Education, Physics, or Sports Medicine

Refer to specific transfer area of choice: Biology, Chemistry, Environmental Studies, Environmental Science, General Science, Geology, Mathematics Physical Education, Physics, or Sports Medicine

Choose any Physical Education Course - Physical Education Area of Study should take PM electives and Sports Medicine Area of Study should take PE172

Second Semester

This course encourages a deeper understanding of human nature and the human condition through the study of ideas and values expressed in imaginative literature. Emphasis is placed on the use and development of critical thinking and language skills. Library-oriented research is required. Prerequisite: EN101 English 1: Composition or EN106 English 1: Composition and Reading.

At least 6 credits in a General Education mathematics, at a level approved by the Department administering the program (refer to specific area of study)

Refer to specific transfer area of choice: Biology, Chemistry, Environmental Studies, Environmental Science, General Science, Geology, Mathematics Physical Education, Physics, or Sports Medicine

Refer to specific transfer area of choice: Biology, Chemistry, Environmental Studies, Environmental Science, General Science, Geology, Mathematics Physical Education, Physics, or Sports Medicine

BM101 Survey of Economics, PY101 Introduction to General Psychology, SO101 Introduction to Sociology, AN101 Biological Anthropology, or PS101 American National Government.

Choose any Physical Education Course - Physical Education Area of Study should take PM electives and Sports Medicine Area of Study should take PE172

Third Semester

This course introduces the nature and study of history, and covers the emergence and development of Eurasian civilization to about 1500 A.D. in the Near East, India, China, Europe, the Western Hemisphere, and Africa. Attention is given to religion in these civilizations and on the rise of the West to a position of world power during the Middle Ages.

Take any General Education Natural Sciences Course

Mathematics or Science at a level approved by the Department administering the program.

Refer to specific transfer area of choice: Biology, Chemistry, Environmental Studies, Environmental Science, General Science, Geology, Mathematics Physical Education, Physics, or Sports Medicine

Choose any Physical Education Course - Physical Education Area of Study should take PM electives and Sports Medicine Area of Study should take PE172

Forth Semester

This course is concerned with civilizations and their influences on each other in the modern world. It traces the rise of the West to a position of world dominance and its impact on non-Western societies. Emphasis is placed on the major forces that have shaped the contemporary world - industrialization, urbanization, nationalism, militarism, imperialism, democracy, and communism.

Any GE Humanities CourseCredits: 3.0

Take any General Education Natural Science Course

Refer to specific transfer area of choice: Biology, Chemistry, Environmental Studies, Environmental Science, General Science, Geology, Mathematics Physical Education, Physics, or Sports Medicine

Refer to specific transfer area of choice: Biology, Chemistry, Environmental Studies, Environmental Science, General Science, Geology, Mathematics Physical Education, Physics, or Sports Medicine

Choose any Physical Education Course - Physical Education Area of Study should take PM electives and Sports Medicine Area of Study should take PE172

General requirements: At least 30 General Education Credits in the following areas.

(a) At least 6 of these 30 credits shall be from the following social science areas: BM101 Survey of Economics, PY101 Introduction to General Psychology, SO101 Introduction to Sociology, AN101 Biological Anthropology, PS101 American National Government, GE101 Essentials of World Geography.

(b) At least 6 of these 30 credits shall be in mathematics, at a level approved by the Department administering the program.

(c) At least 8 of these 30 credits shall be in laboratory science, at a level approved by the Department administering the program.

(d) At least 4 of these 30 credits shall be in Mathematics or Science at a level approved by the Department administering the program.

(e) Restrictive Elective  - Refer to specific student transfer advising guide: Biology, Chemistry, Environmental Studies, Environmental Science, General Science, Geology, Mathematics Physical Education, Physics, or Sports Medicine.