Associate in Science Degree

Download PDF

This program is for students whose educational goal is a Bachelor’s degree in business. It prepares students to transfer into a four-year college program in business administration. The complete program is available at the Utica and Rome campuses. Two High School Mathematics Courses or their equivalent, plus one year of laboratory science required.

Goal 1 To prepare the students to enter an institution of higher learning

  • Graduates transfer to a higher educational institution with the appropriate number of SUNY general educational courses

Goal 2 To prepare the students to interact effectively within a diverse business population

  • Students will interact effectively within a diverse student population by completing collaborative projects

Goal 3 To prepare the student to communicate effectively

  • Students will communicate appropriately with instructors and peers through written or oral assignments
  • Students will visually and graphically communicate through presentations and/or projects

Goal 4 To train students to solve business problems

  • Students will demonstrate the use of computers as a problem solving and communications tool
  • Students shall analyze and solve accounting problems

Goal 5 To introduce students to a variety of international business scenarios

  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of world-wide issues related to business

Goal 6 To have students understand that business decisions are based on systematic processes such as accounting systems, MIS, and the economic way of thinking

  • Students will be able to summarize, report, and interpret financial data
  • Students will recognize the language of business
  • Students will illustrate the ability to locate and analyze data
  • Students will use the scientific method to solve business and economic problems

Goal 7 To prepare students to demonstrate information literacy

  • Students will use traditional and contemporary information technology
  • Students will identify, access, and appropriately use authoritative sources of information

Total Credit Hours: 64

First Semester

This course is an opportunity for students to develop the skills necessary to be successful in college. Students learn the importance of the faculty-student and advisor-advisee relationship, develop time management techniques, apply effective study skill techniques, recognize the implications of living in a diverse society, utilize college resources, and explore career and transfer requirements. Collaborative projects are included. Students matriculated in a degree program must take this course in their first term of study.

This course is the first of a sequence that explores fundamental accounting principles, concepts, and practices as a basis for the preparation, understanding, and interpretation of accounting information. It covers the complete accounting cycle for service and merchandising businesses through the adjustment and closing of the books and the preparation of the income statement, the statement of owner equity, and the balance sheet. The details of accounting for cash, receivables, inventory, long-lived assets, and current liabilities are investigated.

EN101 English 1: Composition C-3 Cr-3

This course focuses on several kinds of writing-self-expressive, informative, and argumentative/persuasive, and others. A minimum of five essay compositions are required. The course emphasizes the composition of clear, correct, and effective prose required in a variety of professions and occupations.Prerequisites: The required developmental reading (DS051 Essential Reading & Study Skills, or SL115 ESL4: Advanced Reading), and/or writing courses (EN099 Introduction to College English or SL116 ESL4: Advanced Composition) or permission of the instructor or designee.

This course provides knowledge of relevant computer skills and a solid foundation in the terminology and concepts of computer technology. Experience is provided with a variety of microcomputer software applications, including word processing, electronic spreadsheets, graphics, file management, and integrated software. Concepts and terms focus on preparing for a technologically oriented society and using the computer as a tool for productivity, research, and communication.

MA139 and MA140 or MA150 and MA140 or MA150 and MA151

Take any Physical Education Course

Second Semester

This course is the second of a sequence that explores fundamental accounting principles, concepts, and practices as a basis for the preparation, understanding, and interpretation of accounting information. It covers corporate equity (including the statement of retained earnings), long-term debt, time-value concepts, capital budgeting, cost-volume-profit analysis, and financial statement analysis. Prerequisite: AC115 Financial Accounting.

This course studies the theory and operation of the economy and how government attempts to achieve domestic and international economic goals using monetary and fiscal policies. Topics include are: the nature of economics, the economizing problem, capitalism and the circular-flow, overview of the public sector, measuring output and income, macroeconomic instability, aggregate demand and supply, Keynesian employment theory, fiscal policy and its applications, money, banking, and monetary policy applications, and international trade and finance.

This course encourages a deeper understanding of human nature and the human condition through the study of ideas and values expressed in imaginative literature. Emphasis is placed on the use and development of critical thinking and language skills. Library-oriented research is required. Prerequisite: EN101 English 1: Composition or EN106 English 1: Composition and Reading.

MA139 and MA140 or MA150 and MA140 or MA150 and MA151

Excluding BM101 Survey of Economics

Take any Physical Education Course

Third Semester

This course studies the behavior of the individual and firm in allocating resources in a market system under various the degrees of competition. Topics include the nature of economics, scarcity choice, market pricing and applications, theory of consumer choice, business cost measurement, forms of competition, antitrust and regulations of business, factor pricing, externalities, and pollution. Poverty-income distribution, labor economics, or agricultural economics may also be discussed.

This course emphasizes the basic practices, concepts, and activities involved in developing a successful marketing program. Topics include buyer behavior, market identification, product development, distribution, promotion, pricing, and the uncontrollable factors (economic, social, political, legal and technological) involved in the changing marketing environment of today.

Excluding BM101 Survey of Economics

Take any Physical Education Course

Students must take two of the following: BI101, BI102, CH141, CH142, GL101, GL102, PH141, PH142, PH151, or PH152

Elective based on an individual's transfer goals, normally liberal arts courses taken with permission of advisor. SUNY transfers are encouraged to take an HU or FA elective.

Fourth Semester

This basic law course investigates the application of law to societal and business relationships through a study of the concept of commercial law and its sources, the law of contracts, the law of sales, and the law of negotiable instruments. Lecture, class discussion, and case study comprise the primary methods of instruction In the effort to develop awareness of the logic and application of the law.

This course introduces probability and statistics. Topics include graphs, tables, frequency distributions, measures of central tendency and dispersion, normal distribution, correlation and regression, probability, and inferential statistics. This course is available in two formats: lecture only, or lecture plus laboratory using technology. Prerequisite: An appropriate placement test result or MA090 Essential Math Skills or MA 091 Introductory Algebra, or MA096 Mathematical Literacy.

Students must take two of the following: BI101, BI102, CH141, CH142, GL101, GL102, PH141, PH142, PH151, or PH152

Elective based on an individual's transfer goals, normally liberal arts courses taken with permission of advisor. SUNY transfers are encouraged to take an HU or FA elective.

Elective based on an individual's transfer goals, normally liberal arts courses taken with permission of advisor. SUNY transfers are encouraged to take an HU or FA elective.

Take any Physical Education Course

(a) MA139 and MA140, or MA150 and MA140, or MA150 and MA151.

(b) Excluding BM101 Survey of Economics.

(c) Students must take two of the following: BI141, BI142, CH141, CH142, GL101, GL102, PH141, PH142, PH151, or PH152.

(d) Elective based on an individual’s transfer goals, normally liberal arts courses taken with permission of advisor. SUNY transfers are encouraged to take an HU or FA elective.