Associate in Science Degree

Download PDF

This instruction is designed specifically for students intending to transfer to four-year colleges as physical education majors after graduation from MVCC. Two High School Mathematics Courses or the equivalent, and one year of a laboratory science are required. A third High School Math Course or its equivalent, Biology, Chemistry and Physics are recommended. Total credit hours include a minimum of 58 credit hours from academic areas and a minimum of four credit hours of Physical Education activity courses. Academic courses are drawn from the following offerings with appropriate electives chosen on advisement.

Total Credit Hours: 64 - 65

First Semester

This course is an opportunity for students to develop the skills necessary to be successful in college. Students learn the importance of the faculty-student and advisor-advisee relationship, develop time management techniques, apply effective study skill techniques, recognize the implications of living in a diverse society, utilize college resources, and explore career and transfer requirements. Collaborative projects are included. Students matriculated in a degree program must take this course in their first term of study.

EN101 English 1: Composition C-3 Cr-3

This course focuses on several kinds of writing-self-expressive, informative, and argumentative/persuasive, and others. A minimum of five essay compositions are required. The course emphasizes the composition of clear, correct, and effective prose required in a variety of professions and occupations. Prerequisites: Appropriate high school GPA or placement test score or EN090 Basic Writing Skills or SL116 ESL4: Advanced Composition.

This course gives an understanding of and a feeling for the society in which we live. The concepts and theories discussed relate to humanity, its culture and society, and to those forces that contribute to the smooth operation of this society as well as those forces that contribute to conflict and social problems. Topics include culture, socialization, stratification, population, and patterns of social organization.

This course introduces intermediate algebra-level knowledge and skills. Topics include exponents and radicals, polynomial and rational expressions, functions and relations and their graphs, inequalities, and systems of linear equations. Linear, quadratic, rational, and radical equations are solved. Applications are included. Prerequisite: Appropriate high school GPA or placement test score or MA089 Arithmetic.

This survey course develops a comprehensive overview of American history as well as a deeper understanding of how its geography, people, institutions, and culture interact to define the American experience. It begins with American colonization and concludes on the eve of the Civil War.

This course continues to survey the development of the American story from an agricultural, frontier society to an urban, industrial nation. Emphasis is placed on the economic revolution of the post-Civil War era, its social, political, and military aspects, and the emergence of America as a world leader. It begins with the Civil War and concludes with the present.

Second Semester

This course encourages a deeper understanding of human nature and the human condition through the study of ideas and values expressed in imaginative literature. Emphasis is placed on the use and development of critical thinking and language skills. Library-oriented research is required. Prerequisite: EN101 English 1: Composition or EN105 English Composition for Speakers of Other Languages or EN106 English 1: Composition & Reading.

This course introduces probability and statistics. Topics include graphs, tables, frequency distributions, measures of central tendency and dispersion, normal distribution, correlation and regression, probability, and inferential statistics. This course is available in two formats: lecture only, or lecture plus laboratory using technology. Prerequisite: Appropriate high school GPA or placement test score or MA089 Arithmetic.

This is the first of a two-semester course dealing with the central concepts of biology. Topics include the chemical and cellular basis of life, energy transformations, and classical and molecular genetics. Laboratory exercises mirror lecture topics and include opportunities for the student to practice the scientific method, data collection, and lab report writing.

Take any Sociology course

Third Semester

This course introduces the many and varied facets of psychology. Emphasis is on interactions of individuals in their cultural, social, and economic environments as determined by their cognitive, behavioral, and emotional experiences and training.

The Humanities elective must meet SUNY General Education Requirements.

This course covers the structure and function of the human organism and the regulatory processes that operate within a living system. It introduces general anatomical, physiological, and chemical organization, and includes the integumentary (skin), skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Laboratories involve vertebrate dissection, the use of prosected human cadavers and human skeletal materials, microscope work, non-invasive human experimentation, and possibly animal experimentation. High School Biology or its equivalent is recommended. Students enrolled in Life and Health Sciences Center programs are recommended to complete this course before beginning their specialized program coursework.

This course introduces the nature and study of history, and covers the emergence and development of Eurasian civilization to about 1500 A.D. in the Near East, India, China, Europe, the Western Hemisphere, and Africa. Attention is given to religion in these civilizations and on the rise of the West to a position of world power during the Middle Ages.

Choose One: Natural Science Electives: CH141, CH142, GL101, GL102, PH141, PH142, PH151 or PH152. Social Science Elective: BM101, BM110, BM115, or PS101. Coaching Elective: CO231 or CO232.

Fourth Semester

This course is concerned with civilizations and their influences on each other in the modern world. It traces the rise of the West to a position of world dominance and its impact on non-Western societies. Emphasis is placed on the major forces that have shaped the contemporary world - industrialization, urbanization, nationalism, militarism, imperialism, democracy, and communism.

The Humanities elective must meet SUNY General Education Requirements.

This course, which is a continuation of BI216 Human Anatomy & Physiology 1, involves the study of structure, function, and regulation in the human organism. Topics include blood, peripheral nerves, the cardiovascular system, lymphatics, the respiratory system, the excretory system, the endocrine system, the reproductive systems, the digestive system, and metabolism. Laboratories involve vertebrate dissection, the use of prosected human cadavers and human skeletal materials, microscope work, non-invasive human experimentation, and possibly animal experimentation. Prerequisite: BI216 Human Anatomy & Physiology 1.

(a) History Electives include: HI111 American History 1492 - 1850 OR HI112 American History 1850 - Present.

(b) Restrictive Electives include: Natural Science Electives: CH141, CH142, GL101, GL102, PH141, PH142, PH151 or PH152. Social Science Electives: BM101, BM110, BM115, or PS101. Coaching Electives: CO231 or CO232.